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Holistic Nutrition: 10 Steps to Lifelong Health PDF Print E-mail
Written by Dee McCaffrey, CDC   
Saturday, November 02, 2013
The following article was published in the November 2013 issue of Massage Magazine
Nutrition is a big buzz word these days.  Nearly every week we hear about the newly discovered health benefits of whole foods or the harmful effects of denatured processed foods.  From the heart-protective antioxidants in grapes and dark chocolate to the cancer-causing downside of refined sugar, our national awareness of the role food plays in our health is on the rise.
  A nutritional crisis
While information about healthy food has gone mainstream, personal health is still a mystery to many people.
It’s no secret that the standard American diet—appropriately acronymed SAD—is the worst diet humans have ever eaten, and it has created a health crisis unlike anything seen in human history. Within the last 100 years, we have gone from growing, harvesting, and preparing our own food with our own hands, to mass producing concoctions that are made in laboratories.  In the name of progress, we have blindly and tragically denounced many of our traditional real foods as unhealthy, and replaced them with synthetic look-alikes.  Fearful of rising cholesterol levels and heart disease, we swapped real eggs for Egg Beaters, for example, and real butter for margarine.
Artificial sweeteners, artificial colorings, flavor enhancers, stabilizers, hormones, antibiotics, trans-fats, preservatives, and pesticides have infiltrated our pantries and eateries, stripping us of our birthright of good health.  Most recently, in the 1990’s, genetically modified organisms (GMOs), were unleashed into our food supply without being tested for human safety. Since then, incidences of food allergies, digestive disorders, and cancers have risen sharply.
We’ve become so far removed from foods in their natural state, that we now call such foods “health foods,” a sad admission that we’ve compromised our health for the sake of convenience.  The effects of our nutrient deficient diets and sedentary lifestyles have taken their toll, not just on our bodies, but also on our souls and psyches. Traditional wisdom and sheer intuition tell us that not only is it unnatural to replace real food with chemical concoctions, but this way of eating simply cannot be sustained.
Holistic nutrition
Holistic nutrition involves much more than healthful food choices; it encompasses the care and feeding of the whole person, which has profound effects not only physically, but mentally and emotionally as well.
At its most profound level, health is not is not just the absence of pain, stress, or disease, but also an abundance of vitality, passion and purpose.  It is the daily experience of wholeness and balance—a state of being fully alive.   Getting to this state can begin with conscious, mindful food choices.
Holistic nutrition reaches beyond the conventional approaches of dieting and calorie counting, and employs a variety of approaches concerning food and nutrients, blending traditional, ancient food wisdom from cultures around the world with modern scientific discoveries, as a way to individualize what works best nutritionally for each person.  It takes into account a person's culture, lifestyle, constitution, and how aggressive he or she wants to be with obtaining the results that he or she want to achieve.
Different illnesses, conditions or diseases have different nutritional requirements and each responds to diet and nutrition uniquely. This holistic approach provides ways for each person to participate in the care of his or her own health.
The underlying principles of holistic nutrition are nourishment, mindfulness, awareness and nutritional and environmental responsibility. It helps us to better understand food and appreciate it as an instrument of personal healing.  Nourishing ourselves according to holistic nutrition principles becomes a wise, mature, and loving act of self-care.

Gradual change
The word diet comes from the Greek word dieta, which means discipline, or way of living.  The Latin root of the word means “a day’s journey.”  Holistic nutrition emphasizes and encourages us to approach changes in our food choices as a gradual process to be taken one day a time.  The key is to make real changes—changes we can live with successfully on a long term basis—in the way we approach food, fitness, and the challenges and opportunities of living. Changes are best achieved slowly, as an understanding of food and individual needs deepen.
Although holistic nutrition is largely individualized, there are some basic guidelines that apply to all individuals who wish to follow holistic nutrition principles. One of the main tenets of holistic nutrition is to eat foods in their closest-to-natural form as possible.  The focus is on eating more SOUL foods—that is, foods that are seasonal, organic, unprocessed, and local. We find these are the types of foods that provide our bodies with the highest levels of nutrients and life-force energy. These are also the types of foods humans thrived on for thousands of years.
10 steps to better nutrition
1. Drink plenty of pure water each day. The amount of water each person needs is individual.  To determine the total amount you need, divide your body weight by two.  The resulting number is the number of ounces of water your body needs.  If you are not currently drinking enough water, gradually increase your intake by 8 ounces each week, until you have reached your optimal amount.
2. Read ingredient lists and avoid foods with artificial ingredients. The basic rule of thumb is, if you are buying a prepared food that comes in a box or bag, make sure you know what all the ingredients are and if they have any known health effects.  If the ingredient list includes chemical names you can’t pronounce, it’s a pretty sure bet the product isn’t healthy.
Some ingredients to avoid include aspartame, sucralose, BHA, BHT, TBHQ, monosodium glutamate (MSG), sodium benzoate, nitrates and nitrites, partially hydrogenated oil (aka trans-fats), artificial colors and flavors, and anything with a number after it such as red 40, yellow 5 and polysorbate 80.  These are just a few ingredients with known links to such health effects as headaches, hyperactivity, weight gain and cancer.
3. Eat loads of fresh fruits and vegetables and moderate amounts of whole grains (if appropriate).  Eat at least 2 cups of green, leafy vegetables each day, and strive to include an additional 2 cups of other brightly colored vegetables into your meals and snacks. Juicing some fresh vegetables is a great way to make sure you get the optimal amount each day.
If you do eat grains, expand your horizons and eat a diverse variety.  Minimize wheat and glutinous grains, and instead try some quinoa, buckwheat, millet or teff.
4. Avoid GMOs as much as possible.  More than 90 percent of the corn, soy, canola, cottonseed, and sugar beets grown in the U.S. are from GMO seeds.  A genetically engineered growth hormone, rBGH (recombinant bovine growth hormone) is used on many conventionally raised dairy cows, which results in GMO milk and dairy products.  Ingredients made from these GMO foods are used over 70 percent of processed foods, so it’s best to stay away from as many processed foods as possible.
5. Choose organic. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Organic Program strictly prohibits the use of GMOs in any food carrying the USDA Organic seal.  So if your food carries the organic seal, you know it’s not made from GMOs.
Also, pay attention to the little stickers with numbers on them when buying produce.  If the item is conventionally grown (meaning grown with the use of pesticides), the number on the sticker has four digits (for example, 4060 indicates broccoli). If the item is organically grown, the number has five digits starting with a 9 (94060 indicates organic broccoli). If the number has five digits beginning with an 8, that means the produce you are holding has been genetically modified.
6. Eat small amounts of protein throughout the day, to tame sugar cravings.  If you eat animal protein, select hormone-free, antibiotic-free, organically raised meats, poultry, eggs and dairy.  Animal proteins are best consumed in smaller amounts compared to the plant foods that should make up the majority of your food intake.
7. Minimize caffeine, sugar and alcohol.  These are stimulants that interfere with the body’s natural detoxification pathways, inhibiting and negating your efforts at improving health. If you do drink coffee, make it organic as much as possible.  Conventionally grown coffee beans are one of the crops most heavily sprayed with pesticides.
8. Know which fats are healthy and which aren’t.  Plant based saturated fats such as coconut oil and palm oil, and small amounts of organic butter are the best for baking and cooking because they are stable and don’t oxidize when heated, while monounsaturated fats like olive oil and avocados are less stable and provide the best health benefits when unheated or used with very low heat.  Polyunsaturated fats like vegetable oils, nut and seed oils should be avoided as they are highly unstable when exposed to air and heat and quickly oxidize.  Oxidized oils introduce harmful free radicals into the body, which create chronic inflammation that leads to diabetes, heart disease, and cancers.
Obtain nut and seed oils from eating raw nuts and seeds instead, rather than as pressed oils.  One exception is flaxseed oil, which if properly stored away from heat and light, can be added to foods.
9. If your body temperature is cold, eat more protein, essential fatty acids, seaweeds, and warming spices such as ginger and cayenne.  If your body temperature is warm, eat more cooling foods, such as fruits, vegetables, and green herbal teas and spices like mint, rosemary, lemongrass, and rooibos.
10. Take time to truly enjoy food.  Chew slowly, savor flavors and give thanks for the blessing of the life force energy being transferred into you.
Your care and feeding
“The doctor of the future will no longer treat the human frame with drugs but rather he will cure and prevent disease with nutrition” said Thomas Edison.  In its simplest definition, nutrition refers to “the care and feeding of an organism.”  Understanding how to properly care for and feed ourselves is one of our most important human responsibilities.
Dee McCaffrey is an organic chemist, nutritionist and author of The Science of Skinny: Start Understanding Your Body’s Chemistry and Stop Dieting Forever (Da Capo Lifelong Books 2012).  Dee lost 100 pounds and has kept the weight off for over 20 years by following a whole foods diet. She teaches Holistic Nutrition at Southwest Institute of Healing Arts (SWIHA) in Tempe Arizona. Go HERE to learn more about Dee.

 Southwest Institute of Healing Arts (SWIHA) offers an online and on-campus 200 hour Holistic Nutrition Specialist Program designed for people who are interested in learning to make healthier food and lifestyle choices for themselves, as well as how to develop a meaningful and successful business by helping to make a positive difference in the lives of others.   The program provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the foundations of whole food nutrition and how it contributes to the prevention of illness and the promotion of optimal health. For more info, go to

The Great Pumpkin PDF Print E-mail
Written by Dee McCaffrey, CDC   
Saturday, November 02, 2013

pumpkinsFall is a treasured time of year, and its signature seasonal squash is the brightly colored orange pumpkin.  When ripe, pumpkin can be boiled, baked, steamed, or roasted.  Once cooked, the pumpkin flesh can be eaten as is with some butter or spices for flavoring, or it can be pureed and used to make a variety of delicious dishes including oatmeal, smoothies, corn bread, chili, soup, risotto, lasagna, pies, custard, soufflé and my personal fave—pumpkin bread!  The possibilities for healthy food ideas using pumpkin are endless!

Not only is pumpkin versatile enough to make breakfast, lunch, dinner and dessert, its loaded with nutrients that offer a wide range of health benefits.

 Here’s what’s so great about pumpkins:

Great for the Eyes:A cup of cooked, mashed pumpkin contains more than 200 percent of the recommended daily intake of vitamin A, a powerful antioxidant that aids vision, particularly in dim light.  The gourd gets its bright orange color from the carotenoid beta-carotene, which the body converts into a form of vitamin A for additional eye protection.  Two other carotenoids found in pumpkin—lutein and zeaxanthin—also promote eye health and guard against macular degeneration.

Great for Managing Diabetes and Blood Sugar: Diets rich in beta-carotene also appear to offer protection against developing type 2 diabetes, with pumpkin consumption being the most effective.  Pumpkin flesh contains a compound that increases the level of insulin in the bloodstream, which helps lower blood sugar. Two other major compounds in pumpkin—trigonelline and nicotinic acid—are effective in lowering blood sugar levels by improving insulin resistance and suppressing the onset of diabetes. Trigonelline and nicotinic acid also inhibit the accumulation of triglycerides in the blood, a danger that often accompanies diabetes.

Pumpkin also holds promise for type 1 diabetics:  Chinese researchers found that pumpkin extracts can increase insulin production and regenerate damaged pancreatic cells. This could reduce or eliminate the need for insulin injections in type 1 diabetics.

Great for Boosting the Immune System:Pumpkin is a great source of Vitamin C, which helps fight free radicals and improves immunity. They are also high in phytosterols, which have been shown to enhance the immune response and decrease the risk of certain cancers.  The zinc in pumpkin seeds also boosts the immune system.

Great For Preventing Cancer:  Pumpkins contain compounds called cucurbitacins, which have been found to be effective at inhibiting the development and growth of cancerous tumors of the breast, colon, lung and central nervous system. Cucurbitacins offer the greatest protection against colon cancer. The oil in pumpkin seeds has also shown to be effective in the treatment and prevention of prostate cancer. The high amounts of Vitamin A, Vitamin C and carotenoids in pumpkins also offer protection against various forms of cancer.

Great for the Skin:  The high amount of Vitamins A, C and E as well as alpha-hydroxy acids present in pumpkin all reduce signs of aging in skin and give it a healthy glow.  Pumpkin seeds contain zinc, which also prevents appearance of wrinkles and helps to keep your skin hydrated and nourished. 

pumpkin seedsGreat for Lifting Your Mood:  Pumpkin seeds are rich in the amino acid L-tryptophan, a compound important in the production of the neurotransmitter seratonin, which is responsible for feelings of well-being and happiness. Eating a handful of pumpkin seeds regularly can keep your spirits high and prevent depression. 

Great Source of Fiber:Pumpkin flesh contains abundant quantities of dietary fiber—a one-cup serving of cooked pumpkin contains three grams.  It is extremely effective for treating gastrointestinal disorders such as constipation and indigestion. The high amount of fiber curbs the appetite and reduces fat absorption, which can assist with weight loss. It also helps in lowering the LDL (bad) cholesterol levels and regulating blood sugar levels.

Great Anti-Inflammatory Effect: The beta-carotene in pumpkin seeds and flesh has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Regular consumption of pumpkin can protect against joint inflammation and arthritis. Pumpkins have been known to provide relief from inflammation quickly, without the harmful side effects of anti-inflammatory medicines.

Great for Lowering Blood Pressure and Preventing Heart Disease:  Pumpkin is loaded with potassium and Zinc. Studies show that eating a potassium-rich diet can prevent onset of cardiovascular diseases and hypertension.  Additionally, studies have shown that the phytosterols in pumpkin reduce LDL or "bad" cholesterol.

Great for Preventing Kidney Stones:  Eating just 5 to 10 grams of pumpkin seeds every day stimulates the kidneys and prevents the formation of calcium oxalate stones.

Great Source of Protein and Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Pumpkin seeds, also known as Pepitas, are a rich source of protein and essential fatty acids.  One ounce of pumpkin seeds contains approximately 7 grams of protein. The essential fatty acids present in pumpkin oil offer several health benefits from providing protection against serious health diseases such as high blood pressure, arthritis and cancer to promoting healthy skin and improving brain power.

Given the wide-ranging benefits of all parts of the pumpkin, it’s time this orange squash makes its way into the kitchen now that its role as a Halloween decoration has passed.  For a picture tutorial on how to make your own fresh pumpkin puree, click here.

First Ever Liability Lawsuit Waged Against High Fructose Corn Syrup Manufacturers PDF Print E-mail
Written by Michael McCaffrey   
Sunday, October 06, 2013




There is a civil action lawsuit that we at Processed-Free America are carefully watching.

A few months ago, J. Michael Hayes, a Buffalo, NY attorney, filed an unprecedented civil action lawsuit against six manufacturers of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), including Cargill and Archer Daniels Midland.

The suit is for products liability, failure to warn, gross negligence, reckless conduct and injuries.

The plaintiff is a Buffalo woman and her 14 year old daughter, who now has type 2 diabetes, a condition which Hayes intends to prove was caused directly from the consumption of HFCS.   And he's bringing in the big guns-- "I've got a nationally renowned expert who is solid that HFCS is a cause of type-2 diabetes, which is what we have to prove in the law," Hayes is quoted as saying. "It doesn't have to be the sole cause," he added, but "it has to be a substantial factor."

This case is the first of its kind, and there will most likely be more. With the FDA being so closely tied to the food industry and the massive profits being made from the sale of HFCS, it is unlikely they will take any action.  Hayes says litigation is the next alternative.

The case is in its early stages, but there is already great information revealed from the court documents, including expert testimony on how bad the sweet syrupy stuff really is and how truly different it is to sugar.

Last week, Hays filed a response to the defendants' motion to dismiss the case. It included an affidavit from Robert H. Lustig, M.D., an expert in the field of obesity, metabolism and disease who we've done articles on
before (link to that article here).

According to Lustig, the effects of consuming HFCS contribute to numerous diseases and conditions including:

  • Insulin resistance (which "can and does lead totype 2 diabetes");
  • Damage to the intestinal lining known as "leakygut syndrome";
  • Liver insulin resistance, triggered by theactivation of a liver enzyme which "inactivates a key messenger of insulinaction.";
  • Extra insulin released by the pancreas due toliver insulin resistance;
  • Blocking of the "leptin signal" due to highinsulin that causes "individuals (to) still feel hungry even though they haveeaten."

Even a former FDA official has said that HFCS has such ahigh toxicity level to be considered dangerous to consume. "If we don't get this out of the American diet we are going to end up with a country of lazy,obese, sick young people...this is exactly where it is moving," Dr. Dana Flavin said, "this is a horrendous problem...its toxicity is overwhelming and it's completely destroying the youth of the U.S."

Stay with us as this case progresses. If you haven't signed our petition, we are gatherings signatures to have the most egregious of food additives banned (here's the list). Please click here to sign our petition.



New Study Shows There’s No “Safe” Level of Refined Sugar PDF Print E-mail
Written by Dee McCaffrey, CDC   
Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Sugar is in the news again, and I don’t think we’re going to stop hearing about it any time soon. A new study published in the journal Nature Communications examined the effects of sugar intake among mice--at levels currently considered to be safe--and the results are quite shocking. As it turns out, these “safe” levels of sugar actually have some serious detrimental effects.


Anyone who has read my books knows that I don’t consider any amount of refined sugar “safe” for human consumption—and the scientific research into sugar’s effects on the body continue to support my view.

The study, conducted at the University of Utah, fed mice a daily diet of 25 percent extra sugar—the equivalent of a healthy human diet plus three cans (36 fluid ounces) of sugar-sweetened soda. That’s about the size of a typical convenience store or fast food large fountain drink.

The study was conducted over one year, the average life span for a typical laboratory mouse. So in effect, this was a lifelong study on the animals to look at the effects of chronic sugar consumption. The study results showed that consuming 25 percent more sugar (an amount that is currently considered safe for humans) changed the way mice lived in a contained, natural habitat.

The findings showed that the mortality rate in female mice went from 17 percent to 35 percent (meaning they were twice as likely to die) and male mice produced 25 percent fewer offspring compared to mice on a controlled diet.

James Ruff, a post-doctoral student involved with the study, said the sugar increase was bad for the rodents. “The sugar has done something to their physiological systems that make them worse at competing–worse at dealing with the day-to-day struggles of mouse life. It makes the male not be able to give it their all every day in order to defend and maintain their territories, and it makes it harder for the females to do the incredibly intensive things they have to do–forage for food, gestate, and take care of their pups, which is incredibly taxing,” he said.

Despite the added sugar, the mice didn't become obese or demonstrate significant metabolic symptoms. However, the types of effects the researchers did see were just as harmful to the mice's health as the type of health problems that arise from being the inbred offspring of two cousins. A study on inbred mice was also performed, and researchers said the effects of increased sugar were similar to what was seen among inbred mice. Both the inbred mice and the mice on the added sugar diet lost about 30 percent of their health and fitness and reproductive output.

The study's senior author, biology professor Wayne Potts, said the impact of the sugar was more significant than he expected and stressed the relevancy of the study to humans. “I was surprised how big the effect was that we are actually talking about mortality,” he said. “That’s a pretty big kind of end-point.” "Our results provide evidence that added sugar consumed at concentrations currently considered safe exerts dramatic adverse impacts on mammalian health," Potts said in a press release. "I have reduced refined sugar intake and encouraged my family to do the same," he added.

Currently, the National Research Council recommends that added sugar should not account for more than 25 percent of a person's diet. That does not include naturally occurring sugar found in fruits, vegetables or other non-processed food. Thirteen to 25 percent of Americans consume a dose of added sugar equivalent to that used in the study, Potts said.

The University of Utah researchers said that while mice and humans have different physiological makeups, they are close enough that the side effects of sugar might be something people should consider eliminating from their diet. The results indicate that we need to learn a lot more about what sugar is doing to metabolic mechanisms, and that follow up studies are necessary.

So what to do with a sweet tooth? Use stevia, or other natural sweeteners that have not been shown to have detrimental effects on health.

Soaking Nuts for Good Health PDF Print E-mail
Written by Dee McCaffrey, CDC   
Friday, August 02, 2013

soakednuts-and-seeds-in-seiveNuts and seeds are two power foods that can bestow some serious health benefits—including weight loss, reduced levels of inflammation, reduced risk of heart disease and reduces risk of type 2 diabetes.  However, as a way of preserving and protecting them in the wild, Mother Nature designed them to be quite difficult to digest, and even toxic. 

You see, locked inside all seeds (nuts, grains, and legumes are seeds of plants too) is the genetic material to grow an entire new plant. As you might imagine, Mother Nature would want to protect a seed from anything that might want to consume it before being able to reproduce itself.  Therefore, seeds were equipped with an arsenal of self defense mechanisms known as anti-nutrients, which are contained in the outer seed coat (or bran, in the case of grains).  These toxic anti-nutrients keep insects, predators, bacteria, viruses or fungi, from destroying seeds prematurely.

These anti-nutrients also act as built-in growth inhibitors—a preservation system that allows the seeds to remain dormant for long periods of time.  This is why they can be kept in a dormant state in seedbanks for decades without any damage to their DNA. The anti-nutrients protect the seed until conditions are right to start the growth cycle.  In order to sprout, plants need moisture, warmth, time and slight acidity in the soil or water. 

When placed in water or planted in the ground, a seed will begin to germinate.  Once the germination process starts, natural enzyme activity eliminates the anti-nutrients from the outer seed coating and transforms the long-term-storage properties of the seed into simpler molecules that are easily digested. This is why soaking nuts, seeds, grains, and legumes has been an important part of traditional food preparation for thousands of years. Soaking mimics the natural germination process that occurs in nature.  What’s more, this process unlocks important enzymes and nutrients that are unavailable to us when the seeds or nuts are not soaked.

Before I go into how to soak your nuts and seeds, I want to explain what the anti-nutrients are, why they can be harmful to your health and why soaking is an important practice. The main anti-nutrients are: enzyme inhibitors, phytates, and lectins.

Enzyme inhibitors
Plant seeds, especially nuts and seeds, contain enzyme inhibitors that ward off predators. These inhibitors block enzyme function, particularly the enzymes required to digest proteins, which can put a real strain on the digestive system if consumed in excess.  The inability to digest proteins can lead to chronic inflammation, insulin resistance, impaired digestion, immune suppression, increased allergies, severe intestinal issues and declined mental function.

Phytates (Phytic Acid)
The most known anti-nutrient found in nuts, seeds, and grains is phytic acid (or phytate), a compound that protects the plant seed from premature germination. When you eat foods containing phytates, they combine with calcium, magnesium, copper, iron and especially zinc in the intestinal tract and block their absorption.  Phytates also have the potential to block protein absorption.

Over time, regularly consuming foods that contain phytates can lead to serious mineral deficiencies and cause a wide array of health problems including bone loss, digestive issues, autoimmune diseases, allergies, skin irritations, decaying teeth, and hormone disruption.

However, seeds, nuts, and grains contain an enzyme called phytase, which is activated by soaking and breaks down phytic acid.

Lectins are basically carb-binding proteins that are present in nearly all foods, both plant and animal.  In plants, they act as built-in pesticides that nature intended for warding off predators (humans included).  These types of lectins are highly concentrated in grains (especially wheat), beans (especially soybeans), and nuts. When consumed in large quantities, they are very harmful to the small intestine. They stick to the lining of the small intestine and damage the sensitive villi that are responsible for transporting nutrients into the bloodstream.

Over time, lectins lead to a condition called “leaky gut syndrome” which means that the delicate lining of the small intestine has become so damaged and perforated that undigested food particles,  proteins, toxins and other pathogens are able to “leak” into the bloodstream and bind to tissues and organs throughout the body. This triggers inflammation  in the body as a way to protect the affected tissue. Because of this, lectins are also linked with autoimmune disorders like irritable bowel syndrome, Chron’s disease, ulcerative colitis, thyroid disorders, fibromyalgia, arthritis, lupus and many others.

Soaking and Sprouting Increases Nutritional Content

soaking cashewsIf all this sounds like a hazard to your health, it is!  Many people suffer from the effects of antrinutrients beacuse they eat a large amount of grain foods that have not been soaked or sprouted.  Nuts and seeds are typically eaten in small quantities compared to grains, but it is still important to soak them as well.  When soaked, the vital proteins, vitamins (especially B vitamins), enzymes and minerals are unlocked, making them ten times more nutritious than in their raw unsoaked form. Our not-so-distant ancestors understood this very well. They never consumed these foods without soaking, sprouting, or fermenting them first.  

How to Soak Nuts and Seeds

Place the raw nuts or seeds in a glass jar or bowl and cover them with water of the correct temperature (see the chart below).  Note: If the chart indicates warm water,  it only needs to be warm initially.  You don’t have to keep the water warm for the entire soak time. 

Add a pinch of salt or apple cider vinegar, and allow them to soak according to the chart below.

Drain off the water and DRY the soaked nuts or seeds by blotting them dry with a towel and then spreading them on a baking sheet and put them in the oven with the oven light on.  DO NOT TURN ON THE OVEN.  You can leave them in the oven all day to dry while you are away.  The light will create a very low heat (no higher than 120 degrees) and will allow them to dry, but won’t harm the delicate oils contained within them. 

You may also dry them in a dehydrator.

When you store soaked nuts or seeds, make sure they are completely dry, otherwise they will go moldy very quickly.   Soaked nuts and seeds should also be stored in the refrigerator.

                                 Nut and Seed Soaking Guide

                                            (soaking times are in hours)

soaking TABLE

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Dee on The Science of Skinny

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Dee on Dr. Steve Show NYC PIX11

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Science of Skinny Video Part 1: Dee's Story

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6 Important Foods for Weight Loss

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Dee on Better TV

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Food Additives to Avoid

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Slimming Mexican Cuisine

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Dee on Austin NBC

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A 2012 Intention

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Colleen's Success Story

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Another Success Story

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Buying Organic On Budget

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Sesame Tahini Logs

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Dee's Favorite Breakfast

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Make a Healthy Thanksgiving Feast

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Sweet Halloween Treat

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Healthy Eating for Kids

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Food Label Reading

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Healthy Treat for Kids

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Healthy Greek Turkey Burgers

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Healthy French Toast

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Dee on CBS

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Yummy Stir Fried Rice

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Dee's First TV Appearance

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Processed-Free Chocolate Treats

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Dangers of High Fructose Corn Syrup

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Dee on Plan-D

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About Plan-D Online Course

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